Book Now

Book Now
Book Photos

Homesteaders of America

Homesteaders of America
Homesteaders of America

Current Books

Current Books
Current Books

Sunny With a Chance of Overexposure

It is quite often the one thing that constantly terrorizes natural light photographers -- the sun just isn't cooperating with you. But the sad reality is that new or inexperienced photographers often feel the need to have photos overexposed on a regular basis when it comes to editing. I've even met photographers who purposefully ruin an incredible photo (taken in the shade!) because they are trying to make their photos look like someone elses post process editing style -- and in return, a severely overexposed photo is the final outcome. Trust me, I know it's done in editing because there's no way those photos came out looking overly saturated and overly exposed...it's not physically possible.

I could pull about 150 examples that I've seen on social media (from local and non-local photographers) in the past 2 weeks right now, but I won't. Because quite honestly, we are all constantly learning and trying to be the best that we can be. There's no need for judgement or comparison. That won't get anyone anywhere. I'm just here to tell you what everyone (the pro's) is thinking, but that no one will sit down and take the time to tell you. Yes, I'm that photographer....because I've been there, and I wish someone would have told me.

Since I refuse to use other peoples photos, I'm going to use my own. Honestly, there is no need to call people out for your own benefit. No one ever got any taller from making someone else feel smaller.

I'll use my own photos for examples...

OVEREXPOSED STRAIGHT OUT OF CAMERA

This photo was overexposed for several different reasons -- all of them being my own fault. First of all, there was snow on the ground. And whatever prompted me to put them in front of a white backdrop with snow coming from the left side (a literal snow pile)...I have no idea. But it's over now and well, the final product was an overexposed photo because, a.) I placed them improperly and b.) I forgot to change my camera settings.

How can you tell when a photo is overexposed? Very easily. Some of the tell-tale signs are in the clients faces. Their cheeks and foreheads are "glowing", and they shouldn't be. Sometimes on photos like these, it's hard to fix 

No comments